Accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in two Acacia (Leguminosae; Mimosoideae) species grown in different substrates proposed for mine-site rehabilitation

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Abstract

© 2015 Botanical Society of America. • Premise of the study: Few studies have investigated the effects of substrates on the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in plants. Acacia stipuligera and A. robeorum growing in their natural habitats with different substrates show different accumulation and precipitation patterns of these elements. Here, we compared the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in A. stipuligera and A. robeorum grown in different substrates proposed for mine-site rehabilitation and expected the differences in substrates to have significant effects on the accumulation and precipitation of these elements in the two species. • Methods: Saplings were grown in sandy topsoil or in a topsoil–siltstone mixture in a glasshouse. Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations of 25-wk-old plants were measured. Precipitation of these elements in phyllodes and branchlets was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. • Key results: Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations were generally significantly greater in A. robeorum than in A. stipuligera . The two species responded in unique ways to the substrate, with A. stipuligera having similar phyllode magnesium and calcium concentrations in both substrates, but greater sulfur concentration in the topsoil–siltstone mixture, while A. robeorum showed lower phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations in the topsoil–siltstone mixture. For both substrates, mineral precipitates were observed in both species, with A. robeorum having more mineral precipitates containing magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in its phyllodes than A. stipuligera did. • Conclusions: The accumulation and precipitation patterns of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur are more species-specific than substrate-affected.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290-301
JournalAmerican Journal of Botany
Volume102
Issue number2
Early online date20 Jan 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2015

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Acacia
Mimosoideae
Sulfur
Fabaceae
Magnesium
magnesium
sulfur
Rehabilitation
calcium
Calcium
substrate
Minerals
minerals
site rehabilitation
mineral
sapling
saplings
Electron Scanning Microscopy
topsoil
Ecosystem

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@article{f3ef56d2f74b408c8257e7cb0c81e165,
title = "Accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in two Acacia (Leguminosae; Mimosoideae) species grown in different substrates proposed for mine-site rehabilitation",
abstract = "{\circledC} 2015 Botanical Society of America. • Premise of the study: Few studies have investigated the effects of substrates on the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in plants. Acacia stipuligera and A. robeorum growing in their natural habitats with different substrates show different accumulation and precipitation patterns of these elements. Here, we compared the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in A. stipuligera and A. robeorum grown in different substrates proposed for mine-site rehabilitation and expected the differences in substrates to have significant effects on the accumulation and precipitation of these elements in the two species. • Methods: Saplings were grown in sandy topsoil or in a topsoil–siltstone mixture in a glasshouse. Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations of 25-wk-old plants were measured. Precipitation of these elements in phyllodes and branchlets was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. • Key results: Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations were generally significantly greater in A. robeorum than in A. stipuligera . The two species responded in unique ways to the substrate, with A. stipuligera having similar phyllode magnesium and calcium concentrations in both substrates, but greater sulfur concentration in the topsoil–siltstone mixture, while A. robeorum showed lower phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations in the topsoil–siltstone mixture. For both substrates, mineral precipitates were observed in both species, with A. robeorum having more mineral precipitates containing magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in its phyllodes than A. stipuligera did. • Conclusions: The accumulation and precipitation patterns of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur are more species-specific than substrate-affected.",
author = "Honghua He and Lyn Kirilak and John Kuo and Hans Lambers",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
doi = "10.3732/ajb.1400543",
language = "English",
volume = "102",
pages = "290--301",
journal = "American Journal of Botany: the journal for all plant biologists",
issn = "0002-9122",
publisher = "BOTANICAL SOC AMER INC",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in two Acacia (Leguminosae; Mimosoideae) species grown in different substrates proposed for mine-site rehabilitation

AU - He, Honghua

AU - Kirilak, Lyn

AU - Kuo, John

AU - Lambers, Hans

PY - 2015/2

Y1 - 2015/2

N2 - © 2015 Botanical Society of America. • Premise of the study: Few studies have investigated the effects of substrates on the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in plants. Acacia stipuligera and A. robeorum growing in their natural habitats with different substrates show different accumulation and precipitation patterns of these elements. Here, we compared the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in A. stipuligera and A. robeorum grown in different substrates proposed for mine-site rehabilitation and expected the differences in substrates to have significant effects on the accumulation and precipitation of these elements in the two species. • Methods: Saplings were grown in sandy topsoil or in a topsoil–siltstone mixture in a glasshouse. Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations of 25-wk-old plants were measured. Precipitation of these elements in phyllodes and branchlets was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. • Key results: Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations were generally significantly greater in A. robeorum than in A. stipuligera . The two species responded in unique ways to the substrate, with A. stipuligera having similar phyllode magnesium and calcium concentrations in both substrates, but greater sulfur concentration in the topsoil–siltstone mixture, while A. robeorum showed lower phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations in the topsoil–siltstone mixture. For both substrates, mineral precipitates were observed in both species, with A. robeorum having more mineral precipitates containing magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in its phyllodes than A. stipuligera did. • Conclusions: The accumulation and precipitation patterns of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur are more species-specific than substrate-affected.

AB - © 2015 Botanical Society of America. • Premise of the study: Few studies have investigated the effects of substrates on the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in plants. Acacia stipuligera and A. robeorum growing in their natural habitats with different substrates show different accumulation and precipitation patterns of these elements. Here, we compared the accumulation and precipitation of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in A. stipuligera and A. robeorum grown in different substrates proposed for mine-site rehabilitation and expected the differences in substrates to have significant effects on the accumulation and precipitation of these elements in the two species. • Methods: Saplings were grown in sandy topsoil or in a topsoil–siltstone mixture in a glasshouse. Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations of 25-wk-old plants were measured. Precipitation of these elements in phyllodes and branchlets was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. • Key results: Phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations were generally significantly greater in A. robeorum than in A. stipuligera . The two species responded in unique ways to the substrate, with A. stipuligera having similar phyllode magnesium and calcium concentrations in both substrates, but greater sulfur concentration in the topsoil–siltstone mixture, while A. robeorum showed lower phyllode magnesium, calcium, and sulfur concentrations in the topsoil–siltstone mixture. For both substrates, mineral precipitates were observed in both species, with A. robeorum having more mineral precipitates containing magnesium, calcium, and sulfur in its phyllodes than A. stipuligera did. • Conclusions: The accumulation and precipitation patterns of magnesium, calcium, and sulfur are more species-specific than substrate-affected.

U2 - 10.3732/ajb.1400543

DO - 10.3732/ajb.1400543

M3 - Article

VL - 102

SP - 290

EP - 301

JO - American Journal of Botany: the journal for all plant biologists

JF - American Journal of Botany: the journal for all plant biologists

SN - 0002-9122

IS - 2

ER -