Acculturation and eating disorders in Asian and Caucasian Australian adolescent girls

P.S. Jennings, David Forbes, B. Mcdermott, S. Juniper, Gary Hulse

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The present study aimed to compare the attitudes and psychopathology of eating disorders between Asian and Caucasian adolescent girls; and investigate the relationship between acculturation and the attitudes and psychopathology of eating disorders in subgroups of Asian girls. Two groups of non-clinical adolescent girls in Perth, Western Australia, were compared using a survey method. There were 17 Asian and 25 Caucasian adolescent girls, aged 14-17 drawn from private high schools in Perth who were screened using the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), the Eating Disorders Inventory (EDI-2), and an acculturation index. The psychopathology scores for eating disorders of the Asian group were significantly higher than that of the Caucasian group in terms of total EDI-2 score, Interpersonal Distrust, Maturity Fears, Impulse Regulation and Social Insecurity subscales. Eating attitudes measured by Dieting subscale of the EAT-26 was significantly different. Within the Asian group, the less acculturated girls had higher scores on the EAT-26 and the EDI-2 than the more acculturated. Less acculturated Asian girls appeared to have unhealthier attitudes and psychopathology toward eating.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)56-61
    JournalPsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
    Volume59
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2005

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