Accessing Primary Health Care: A Community Survey of Issues regarding General Practice and Emergency Department Services in an Outer Metropolitan Area

A.J. Mcgaw, P. Jayasuriya, Caroline Bulsara, Sandra Thompson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This survey aimed to identify views of residents of an outer metropolitan location towards general practice (GP) services, after-hours care and their use of emergency departments (ED). Four hundred respondents were selected randomly using quota sampling and interviewed by telephone. Respondents wanted a GP who was "easy to talk to ", who listened and was interested in them, competent, straightforward and thorough. Of those who were dissatisfied, the main concerns were GPs' unwillingness to listen to the patient and rushing the consultation. GP visits occurred for specific health problems-most commonly fevel; tiredness and respiratory conditions. Preventive advice regarding health and lifestyle issues was not mentioned as a reason for attending GPs. Appointment availability and financial issues impeded access to GPs. Most people who used an ED did so because of the unavailability of GP services, showing that access block starts in general practice, with the severity of their illness/injury being the second major reason.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)78-84
    JournalAustralian Journal of Primary Health
    Volume12
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

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