Absence of dentate nucleus resting-state functional connectivity changes in nonneurological patients with gadolinium-related hyperintensity on T-1-weighted images

Carlo A. Mallio, Claudia Piervincenzi, Eliana Gianolio, Vincenzo Cirimele, Luigi G. Papparella, Massimo Marano, Livia Quintiliani, Silvio Aime, Filippo Carducci, Paul M. Parizel, Carlo C. Quattrocchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The dentate nuclei of the cerebellum are the areas where gadolinium predominantly accumulates. It is not yet known whether gadolinium deposition affects brain functions. Purpose/Hypothesis To assess whether gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity of the cerebellum on T-1-weighted images of nonneurological adult patients with Crohn's disease is associated with modifications of resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the cerebellum and dentate nucleus. Study Type Observational, cross-sectional. Population Fifteen patients affected by Crohn's disease were compared with 16 healthy age- and gender-matched control subjects. All participants underwent neurological, neurocognitive-psychological assessment, and blood sampling. Field Strength/Sequence 1.5-T magnet blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI. Assessment High signal intensity on T-1-weighted images, cerebellum functional connectivity, neurocognitive performance, and blood circulating gadolinium levels. Statistical Tests An unpaired two-sample t-test (age and sex were nuisance variables) was used to investigate between-group differences in cerebellar and dentate nucleus functional connectivity. Z-statistical images were set using clusters determined by Z > 2.3 and a familywise error (FWE)-corrected cluster significance threshold of P = 0.05. Results Dentate nuclei RSFC was not different (P = n.s.) between patients with gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity on T-1-weighted images and controls. Pre- and postcentral gyrus bilaterally and the right supplementary motor cortex showed a decrease of RSFC with the cerebellum hemispheres (P <0.05 FWE-corrected) and was related to disease duration but not to gadodiamide cumulative doses (P = n.s.). Data Conclusion Crohn's disease patients with gadolinium-dependent hyperintense dentate nuclei on unenhanced T-1-weighted images do not show dentate nucleus RSFC changes. Technical Efficacy Stage: 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019;50:445-455.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)445-455
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume50
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

© 2019 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

Cite this

Mallio, Carlo A. ; Piervincenzi, Claudia ; Gianolio, Eliana ; Cirimele, Vincenzo ; Papparella, Luigi G. ; Marano, Massimo ; Quintiliani, Livia ; Aime, Silvio ; Carducci, Filippo ; Parizel, Paul M. ; Quattrocchi, Carlo C. / Absence of dentate nucleus resting-state functional connectivity changes in nonneurological patients with gadolinium-related hyperintensity on T-1-weighted images. In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 2019 ; Vol. 50, No. 2. pp. 445-455.
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title = "Absence of dentate nucleus resting-state functional connectivity changes in nonneurological patients with gadolinium-related hyperintensity on T-1-weighted images",
abstract = "Background The dentate nuclei of the cerebellum are the areas where gadolinium predominantly accumulates. It is not yet known whether gadolinium deposition affects brain functions. Purpose/Hypothesis To assess whether gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity of the cerebellum on T-1-weighted images of nonneurological adult patients with Crohn's disease is associated with modifications of resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the cerebellum and dentate nucleus. Study Type Observational, cross-sectional. Population Fifteen patients affected by Crohn's disease were compared with 16 healthy age- and gender-matched control subjects. All participants underwent neurological, neurocognitive-psychological assessment, and blood sampling. Field Strength/Sequence 1.5-T magnet blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI. Assessment High signal intensity on T-1-weighted images, cerebellum functional connectivity, neurocognitive performance, and blood circulating gadolinium levels. Statistical Tests An unpaired two-sample t-test (age and sex were nuisance variables) was used to investigate between-group differences in cerebellar and dentate nucleus functional connectivity. Z-statistical images were set using clusters determined by Z > 2.3 and a familywise error (FWE)-corrected cluster significance threshold of P = 0.05. Results Dentate nuclei RSFC was not different (P = n.s.) between patients with gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity on T-1-weighted images and controls. Pre- and postcentral gyrus bilaterally and the right supplementary motor cortex showed a decrease of RSFC with the cerebellum hemispheres (P <0.05 FWE-corrected) and was related to disease duration but not to gadodiamide cumulative doses (P = n.s.). Data Conclusion Crohn's disease patients with gadolinium-dependent hyperintense dentate nuclei on unenhanced T-1-weighted images do not show dentate nucleus RSFC changes. Technical Efficacy Stage: 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019;50:445-455.",
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author = "Mallio, {Carlo A.} and Claudia Piervincenzi and Eliana Gianolio and Vincenzo Cirimele and Papparella, {Luigi G.} and Massimo Marano and Livia Quintiliani and Silvio Aime and Filippo Carducci and Parizel, {Paul M.} and Quattrocchi, {Carlo C.}",
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Mallio, CA, Piervincenzi, C, Gianolio, E, Cirimele, V, Papparella, LG, Marano, M, Quintiliani, L, Aime, S, Carducci, F, Parizel, PM & Quattrocchi, CC 2019, 'Absence of dentate nucleus resting-state functional connectivity changes in nonneurological patients with gadolinium-related hyperintensity on T-1-weighted images' Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, vol. 50, no. 2, pp. 445-455. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmri.26669

Absence of dentate nucleus resting-state functional connectivity changes in nonneurological patients with gadolinium-related hyperintensity on T-1-weighted images. / Mallio, Carlo A.; Piervincenzi, Claudia; Gianolio, Eliana; Cirimele, Vincenzo; Papparella, Luigi G.; Marano, Massimo; Quintiliani, Livia; Aime, Silvio; Carducci, Filippo; Parizel, Paul M.; Quattrocchi, Carlo C.

In: Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Vol. 50, No. 2, 08.2019, p. 445-455.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Absence of dentate nucleus resting-state functional connectivity changes in nonneurological patients with gadolinium-related hyperintensity on T-1-weighted images

AU - Mallio, Carlo A.

AU - Piervincenzi, Claudia

AU - Gianolio, Eliana

AU - Cirimele, Vincenzo

AU - Papparella, Luigi G.

AU - Marano, Massimo

AU - Quintiliani, Livia

AU - Aime, Silvio

AU - Carducci, Filippo

AU - Parizel, Paul M.

AU - Quattrocchi, Carlo C.

N1 - © 2019 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

PY - 2019/8

Y1 - 2019/8

N2 - Background The dentate nuclei of the cerebellum are the areas where gadolinium predominantly accumulates. It is not yet known whether gadolinium deposition affects brain functions. Purpose/Hypothesis To assess whether gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity of the cerebellum on T-1-weighted images of nonneurological adult patients with Crohn's disease is associated with modifications of resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the cerebellum and dentate nucleus. Study Type Observational, cross-sectional. Population Fifteen patients affected by Crohn's disease were compared with 16 healthy age- and gender-matched control subjects. All participants underwent neurological, neurocognitive-psychological assessment, and blood sampling. Field Strength/Sequence 1.5-T magnet blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI. Assessment High signal intensity on T-1-weighted images, cerebellum functional connectivity, neurocognitive performance, and blood circulating gadolinium levels. Statistical Tests An unpaired two-sample t-test (age and sex were nuisance variables) was used to investigate between-group differences in cerebellar and dentate nucleus functional connectivity. Z-statistical images were set using clusters determined by Z > 2.3 and a familywise error (FWE)-corrected cluster significance threshold of P = 0.05. Results Dentate nuclei RSFC was not different (P = n.s.) between patients with gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity on T-1-weighted images and controls. Pre- and postcentral gyrus bilaterally and the right supplementary motor cortex showed a decrease of RSFC with the cerebellum hemispheres (P <0.05 FWE-corrected) and was related to disease duration but not to gadodiamide cumulative doses (P = n.s.). Data Conclusion Crohn's disease patients with gadolinium-dependent hyperintense dentate nuclei on unenhanced T-1-weighted images do not show dentate nucleus RSFC changes. Technical Efficacy Stage: 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019;50:445-455.

AB - Background The dentate nuclei of the cerebellum are the areas where gadolinium predominantly accumulates. It is not yet known whether gadolinium deposition affects brain functions. Purpose/Hypothesis To assess whether gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity of the cerebellum on T-1-weighted images of nonneurological adult patients with Crohn's disease is associated with modifications of resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) of the cerebellum and dentate nucleus. Study Type Observational, cross-sectional. Population Fifteen patients affected by Crohn's disease were compared with 16 healthy age- and gender-matched control subjects. All participants underwent neurological, neurocognitive-psychological assessment, and blood sampling. Field Strength/Sequence 1.5-T magnet blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI. Assessment High signal intensity on T-1-weighted images, cerebellum functional connectivity, neurocognitive performance, and blood circulating gadolinium levels. Statistical Tests An unpaired two-sample t-test (age and sex were nuisance variables) was used to investigate between-group differences in cerebellar and dentate nucleus functional connectivity. Z-statistical images were set using clusters determined by Z > 2.3 and a familywise error (FWE)-corrected cluster significance threshold of P = 0.05. Results Dentate nuclei RSFC was not different (P = n.s.) between patients with gadolinium-dependent high signal intensity on T-1-weighted images and controls. Pre- and postcentral gyrus bilaterally and the right supplementary motor cortex showed a decrease of RSFC with the cerebellum hemispheres (P <0.05 FWE-corrected) and was related to disease duration but not to gadodiamide cumulative doses (P = n.s.). Data Conclusion Crohn's disease patients with gadolinium-dependent hyperintense dentate nuclei on unenhanced T-1-weighted images do not show dentate nucleus RSFC changes. Technical Efficacy Stage: 5 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2019;50:445-455.

KW - dentate nucleus

KW - gadolinium based contrast agents

KW - Crohn's disease

KW - fMRI

KW - brain connectivity

KW - T1-WEIGHTED MR-IMAGES

KW - T1 SIGNAL INTENSITY

KW - GLOBUS-PALLIDUS

KW - REGIONAL HOMOGENEITY

KW - BRAIN INVOLVEMENT

KW - CROHNS-DISEASE

KW - DEPOSITION

KW - ROBUST

KW - RETENTION

KW - PATTERNS

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DO - 10.1002/jmri.26669

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 445

EP - 455

JO - Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

JF - Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

SN - 1053-1807

IS - 2

ER -