Abdominal aortic calcification on lateral spine images captured during bone density testing and late-life dementia risk in older women: A prospective cohort study

Tenielle Porter, Marc Sim, Richard L. Prince, John T. Schousboe, Catherine Bondonno, Wai H. Lim, Kun Zhu, Douglas P. Kiel, Jonathan M. Hodgson, Simon M. Laws, Joshua R. Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Dementia after the age of 80 years (late-life) is increasingly common due to vascular and non-vascular risk factors. Identifying individuals at higher risk of late-life dementia remains a global priority. Methods: In prospective study of 958 ambulant community-dwelling older women (≥70 years), lateral spine images (LSI) captured in 1998 (baseline) from a bone density machine were used to assess abdominal aortic calcification (AAC). AAC was classified into established categories (low, moderate and extensive). Cardiovascular risk factors and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotyping were evaluated. Incident 14.5-year late-life dementia was identified from linked hospital and mortality records. Findings: At baseline women were 75.0 ± 2.6 years, 44.7% had low AAC, 36.4% had moderate AAC and 18.9% had extensive AAC. Over 14.5- years, 150 (15.7%) women had a late-life dementia hospitalisation (n = 132) and/or death (n = 58). Compared to those with low AAC, women with moderate and extensive AAC were more likely to suffer late-life dementia hospitalisations (9.3%, 15.5%, 18.3%, respectively) and deaths (2.8%, 8.3%, 9.4%, respectively). After adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and APOE, women with moderate and extensive AAC had twice the relative hazards of late-life dementia (moderate, aHR 2.03 95%CI 1.38–2.97; extensive, aHR 2.10 95%CI 1.33–3.32), compared to women with low AAC. Interpretation: In community-dwelling older women, those with more advanced AAC had higher risk of late-life dementia, independent of cardiovascular risk factors and APOE genotype. Given the widespread use of bone density testing, simultaneously capturing AAC information may be a novel, non-invasive, scalable approach to identify older women at risk of late-life dementia. Funding: Kidney Health Australia, Healthway Health Promotion Foundation of Western Australia, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Research Advisory Committee Grant, National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number100502
JournalThe Lancet Regional Health - Western Pacific
Volume26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2022

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