A whole genome scan of SNP data suggests a lack of abundant hard selective sweeps in the genome of the broad host range plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

Mark Charles Derbyshire, Matthew Denton-Giles, James K. Hane, Steven Chang, Mahsa Mousavi-Derazmahalleh, Sylvain Raffaele, Lone Buchwaldt, Lars G. Kamphuis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infects over 600 species of plant. It is present in numerous environments throughout the world and causes significant damage to many agricultural crops. Fragmentation and lack of gene flow between populations may lead to population sub-structure. Within discrete recombining populations, positive selection may lead to a ‘selective sweep’. This is characterised by an increase in frequency of a favourable allele leading to reduction in genotypic diversity in a localised genomic region due to the phenomenon of genetic hitchhiking. We aimed to assess whether isolates of S. sclerotiorum from around the world formed genotypic clusters associated with geographical origin and to determine whether signatures of population-specific positive selection could be detected. To do this, we sequenced the genomes of 25 isolates of S. sclerotiorum collected from four different continents–Australia, Africa (north and south), Europe and North America (Canada and the northen United States) and conducted SNP based analyses of population structure and selective sweeps. Among the 25 isolates, there was evidence for two major population clusters. One of these consisted of 11 isolates from Canada, the USA and France (population 1), and the other consisted of nine isolates from Australia and one from Morocco (population 2). The rest of the isolates were genotypic outliers. We found that there was evidence of outcrossing in these two populations based on linkage disequilibrium decay. However, only a single candidate selective sweep was observed, and it was present in population 2. This sweep was close to a Major Facilitator Superfamily transporter gene, and we speculate that this gene may have a role in nutrient uptake from the host. The low abundance of selective sweeps in the S. sclerotiorum genome contrasts the numerous examples in the genomes of other fungal pathogens. This may be a result of its slow rate of evolution and low effective recombination rate due to self-fertilisation and vegetative reproduction.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0214201
JournalPLoS One
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019

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Ascomycota
Sclerotinia sclerotiorum
Host Specificity
plant pathogenic fungi
Fungi
host range
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Genes
Genome
genome
Population
Canada
Pathogens
Fungal Genome
Self-Fertilization
Nutrients
Crops
Genetic Phenomena
Agricultural Crops
Northern Africa

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Derbyshire, Mark Charles ; Denton-Giles, Matthew ; Hane, James K. ; Chang, Steven ; Mousavi-Derazmahalleh, Mahsa ; Raffaele, Sylvain ; Buchwaldt, Lone ; Kamphuis, Lars G. / A whole genome scan of SNP data suggests a lack of abundant hard selective sweeps in the genome of the broad host range plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. In: PLoS One. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 3.
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A whole genome scan of SNP data suggests a lack of abundant hard selective sweeps in the genome of the broad host range plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. / Derbyshire, Mark Charles; Denton-Giles, Matthew; Hane, James K.; Chang, Steven; Mousavi-Derazmahalleh, Mahsa; Raffaele, Sylvain; Buchwaldt, Lone; Kamphuis, Lars G.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 14, No. 3, e0214201, 01.03.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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