A socio-economic study on smallholder acacia plantations in Indonesia: factors affecting past and future adoption

Dwiko Budi Permadi

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

Deforestation has led the Indonesian government to reforest land to offset degradation and alleviate poverty. Since the 1960s,
reforestation schemes have relied on fast growing species, mainly Acacia spp, but many factors prevent their adoption by
smallholders and industrial plantations. This study has contributed to understanding past adoption of smallholder acacia
plantations, the role of policy schemes and their livelihood assets. The forestry partnerships benefit rural development but have
limited impacts on their livelihood outcomes. Future adoption will require forest agencies (corporate and government) to design
effective reforestation schemes that promote social safeguards, considering smallholder preference heterogeneity for selecting
commercial forestry options.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Burton, Michael, Supervisor
  • Pandit, Ram, Supervisor
  • Walker, Iain , Supervisor
  • Race, Digby, Supervisor, External person
  • Ma, Chunbo, Supervisor
Award date31 Mar 2018
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2018

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