A severe phenotype of Gitelman syndrome with increased prostaglandin excretion and favorable response to indomethacin

N. Larkins, M. Wallis, B. McGillivray, C. Mammen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our understanding of Gitelman syndrome (GS) and Bartter syndrome has continued to evolve with the use of genetic testing to more precisely define the tubular defects responsible. GS is caused by mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the Na+–Cl− co-transporter of the distal convoluted tubule (NCCT) and tends to be associated with a milder salt-losing phenotype. We describe two female siblings presenting in infancy with a severe salt-losing tubulopathy and failure to thrive due to compound heterozygous mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the NCCT. Both children were treated with indomethacin resulting in improved linear growth and polyuria. Some atypical biochemical findings in our cases are discussed including raised urinary prostaglandin (PGE2) excretion that normalized with intravenous fluid repletion.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)306-310
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Kidney Journal
Volume7
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Gitelman Syndrome
Indomethacin
Prostaglandins
Salts
Bartter Syndrome
Symporters
Phenotype
Polyuria
Failure to Thrive
Mutation
Genetic Testing
Dinoprostone
Genes
Siblings
Growth

Cite this

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abstract = "Our understanding of Gitelman syndrome (GS) and Bartter syndrome has continued to evolve with the use of genetic testing to more precisely define the tubular defects responsible. GS is caused by mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the Na+–Cl− co-transporter of the distal convoluted tubule (NCCT) and tends to be associated with a milder salt-losing phenotype. We describe two female siblings presenting in infancy with a severe salt-losing tubulopathy and failure to thrive due to compound heterozygous mutations in the SLC12A3 gene encoding the NCCT. Both children were treated with indomethacin resulting in improved linear growth and polyuria. Some atypical biochemical findings in our cases are discussed including raised urinary prostaglandin (PGE2) excretion that normalized with intravenous fluid repletion.",
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A severe phenotype of Gitelman syndrome with increased prostaglandin excretion and favorable response to indomethacin. / Larkins, N.; Wallis, M.; McGillivray, B.; Mammen, C.

In: Clinical Kidney Journal, Vol. 7, No. 3, 06.2014, p. 306-310.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - A severe phenotype of Gitelman syndrome with increased prostaglandin excretion and favorable response to indomethacin

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AU - McGillivray, B.

AU - Mammen, C.

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