A randomized controlled trial of unguided internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism in adolescents: Impact on risk for eating disorders

Chloe Y. Shu, Hunna J. Watson, Rebecca A. Anderson, Tracey D. Wade, Robert T. Kane, Sarah J. Egan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Perfectionism is a risk factor for the development and maintenance of eating disorders. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of unguided Internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism (ICBT-P) as a treatment and prevention for perfectionism and symptoms of eating disorders, anxiety, depression and self-esteem in female adolescents. Method: Young women (N = 94, 14–19 years) who self-identified as having difficulties with perfectionism but did not have a clinical eating disorder diagnosis were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into one of three groups: unguided ICBT-P, unguided ICBT for nonspecific stress management (ICBT-S), or waitlist control. Results: All analyses were intent-to-treat. ICBT-P resulted in the most favorable outcomes at post-treatment and 3- and 6-months follow-up. ICBT-P was superior to control on all outcome measures at 3- and 6-months and superior to ICBT-S on all outcomes over most time points (ds = 0.13–0.94). Clinical significance analysis demonstrated that the treatment prevented symptom increases over 6-month follow-up, with ICBT-P superior to ICBT-S in prevention of clinical perfectionism and depressive symptoms, and ICBT-P superior to waitlist control in prevention of eating disorder symptoms. There was relatively high attrition, although there were no differences in attrition between the groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up and rates were commensurate with other Internet interventions. Discussion: The findings support unguided ICBT-P as a useful target for preventing eating disorder and associated symptoms in female youth who self-identify as perfectionistic. Anzctr trial number: ACTRN12615001098527.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103429
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume120
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2019

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Cognitive Therapy
Internet
Randomized Controlled Trials
Feeding and Eating Disorders
Perfectionism
Depression
Self Concept
Therapeutics
Anxiety
Maintenance
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Cite this

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title = "A randomized controlled trial of unguided internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism in adolescents: Impact on risk for eating disorders",
abstract = "Objective: Perfectionism is a risk factor for the development and maintenance of eating disorders. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of unguided Internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism (ICBT-P) as a treatment and prevention for perfectionism and symptoms of eating disorders, anxiety, depression and self-esteem in female adolescents. Method: Young women (N = 94, 14–19 years) who self-identified as having difficulties with perfectionism but did not have a clinical eating disorder diagnosis were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into one of three groups: unguided ICBT-P, unguided ICBT for nonspecific stress management (ICBT-S), or waitlist control. Results: All analyses were intent-to-treat. ICBT-P resulted in the most favorable outcomes at post-treatment and 3- and 6-months follow-up. ICBT-P was superior to control on all outcome measures at 3- and 6-months and superior to ICBT-S on all outcomes over most time points (ds = 0.13–0.94). Clinical significance analysis demonstrated that the treatment prevented symptom increases over 6-month follow-up, with ICBT-P superior to ICBT-S in prevention of clinical perfectionism and depressive symptoms, and ICBT-P superior to waitlist control in prevention of eating disorder symptoms. There was relatively high attrition, although there were no differences in attrition between the groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up and rates were commensurate with other Internet interventions. Discussion: The findings support unguided ICBT-P as a useful target for preventing eating disorder and associated symptoms in female youth who self-identify as perfectionistic. Anzctr trial number: ACTRN12615001098527.",
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A randomized controlled trial of unguided internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism in adolescents : Impact on risk for eating disorders. / Shu, Chloe Y.; Watson, Hunna J.; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Wade, Tracey D.; Kane, Robert T.; Egan, Sarah J.

In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, Vol. 120, 103429, 01.09.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A randomized controlled trial of unguided internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism in adolescents

T2 - Impact on risk for eating disorders

AU - Shu, Chloe Y.

AU - Watson, Hunna J.

AU - Anderson, Rebecca A.

AU - Wade, Tracey D.

AU - Kane, Robert T.

AU - Egan, Sarah J.

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - Objective: Perfectionism is a risk factor for the development and maintenance of eating disorders. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of unguided Internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism (ICBT-P) as a treatment and prevention for perfectionism and symptoms of eating disorders, anxiety, depression and self-esteem in female adolescents. Method: Young women (N = 94, 14–19 years) who self-identified as having difficulties with perfectionism but did not have a clinical eating disorder diagnosis were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into one of three groups: unguided ICBT-P, unguided ICBT for nonspecific stress management (ICBT-S), or waitlist control. Results: All analyses were intent-to-treat. ICBT-P resulted in the most favorable outcomes at post-treatment and 3- and 6-months follow-up. ICBT-P was superior to control on all outcome measures at 3- and 6-months and superior to ICBT-S on all outcomes over most time points (ds = 0.13–0.94). Clinical significance analysis demonstrated that the treatment prevented symptom increases over 6-month follow-up, with ICBT-P superior to ICBT-S in prevention of clinical perfectionism and depressive symptoms, and ICBT-P superior to waitlist control in prevention of eating disorder symptoms. There was relatively high attrition, although there were no differences in attrition between the groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up and rates were commensurate with other Internet interventions. Discussion: The findings support unguided ICBT-P as a useful target for preventing eating disorder and associated symptoms in female youth who self-identify as perfectionistic. Anzctr trial number: ACTRN12615001098527.

AB - Objective: Perfectionism is a risk factor for the development and maintenance of eating disorders. The objective of this study was to examine the efficacy of unguided Internet cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism (ICBT-P) as a treatment and prevention for perfectionism and symptoms of eating disorders, anxiety, depression and self-esteem in female adolescents. Method: Young women (N = 94, 14–19 years) who self-identified as having difficulties with perfectionism but did not have a clinical eating disorder diagnosis were recruited. Participants were randomly allocated into one of three groups: unguided ICBT-P, unguided ICBT for nonspecific stress management (ICBT-S), or waitlist control. Results: All analyses were intent-to-treat. ICBT-P resulted in the most favorable outcomes at post-treatment and 3- and 6-months follow-up. ICBT-P was superior to control on all outcome measures at 3- and 6-months and superior to ICBT-S on all outcomes over most time points (ds = 0.13–0.94). Clinical significance analysis demonstrated that the treatment prevented symptom increases over 6-month follow-up, with ICBT-P superior to ICBT-S in prevention of clinical perfectionism and depressive symptoms, and ICBT-P superior to waitlist control in prevention of eating disorder symptoms. There was relatively high attrition, although there were no differences in attrition between the groups at 3- and 6-month follow-up and rates were commensurate with other Internet interventions. Discussion: The findings support unguided ICBT-P as a useful target for preventing eating disorder and associated symptoms in female youth who self-identify as perfectionistic. Anzctr trial number: ACTRN12615001098527.

KW - Adolescent

KW - Anxiety

KW - Depression

KW - Eating disorder

KW - Female

KW - Internet

KW - Perfectionism

KW - Prevention

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DO - 10.1016/j.brat.2019.103429

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