A randomised trial of the short-term effect of a minimal nutrition intervention in general practice

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Abstract

Objective: To test the effectiveness of a minimal nutrition intervention to increase dietary intake of folate.Method: Randomised controlled trial in the general practice setting of personalised, face-to-face feedback with educational materials to increase dietary intake of folate.Results: One hundred and nine intervention and 94 control subjects completed baseline and follow-up assessments within the study period. At baseline (August-October 2004), there were no significant differences in folate intake scores between the intervention and control groups. At the eight-week follow-up, the mean folate intake score in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group, indicating that the nutrition intervention significantly increased reported dietary intake of folate.Conclusion: Presenting individual dietary feedback in conjunction with educational materials in the general practice setting is an effective way of changing dietary behaviour,Implications: The present study suggests a way in which health-related dietary change may be encouraged on a large scale without incurring a large cost.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)414-418
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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