A Prospective Study Investigating the Impact of Obesity on the Immune Response to the Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine in Children and Adolescents

Michelle Clarke, Suja M. Mathew, Lynne C. Giles, Alexia S. Pena, Ian G. Barr, Peter C. Richmond, Helen S. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Obesity can increase the severity of influenza infection. Data are limited regarding immune responses to influenza vaccination in obese children. We aimed to investigate the impact of obesity on quadrivalent influenza vaccine responses in children. Children with obesity (body mass index (BMI) ≥ 95th percentile for age and gender) and children without obesity (BMI < 95th percentile) were enrolled in the study. Blood samples were collected before, 1, and 6 months after influenza vaccination, to measure antibody responses by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Vaccine immunogenicity outcomes were compared between children with and without obesity. Forty-four children (mean age 13.3 ± 2.1 years, 18 males and 14 with obesity) completed the 6-month study. More than 90% of the participants with and without obesity had seroprotective antibody titres (HI ≥ 40) at both 1 and 6 months following vaccination for each of the four influenza strains (A/H3N2, A/H1N1, B/(Victoria) and B/(Yamagata)). Influenza-specific geometric mean titres at baseline, 1, and 6 months post-vaccination were similar between children with and without obesity for all influenza vaccine strains. Children with and without obesity have robust, sustained antibody responses over 6 months to the quadrivalent influenza vaccine.

Original languageEnglish
Article number699
JournalVaccines
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2022

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