A preliminary assessment of the role of ambient nitric oxide exposure in hospitalization with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

N.I. Mohammed, Mark L. Everard, J.G. Ayres, N.J. Barker, I.J. Litchfield

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    Abstract

    © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.Some in vitro studies have indicated a possible link between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and exposure to Nitric Oxide (NO). However, these studies used much higher NO concentrations than normally found in the ambient environment. This preliminary study explored whether an association was present with short-term exposure to NO in the environment. RSV-related admission data between November 2011 and February 2012 were obtained from Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The dates of admission were linked to contemporaneous ambient NO derived from sentinel air monitors. The case-crossover design was used to study the relationship between daily RSV admissions and NO, controlling for temperature and relative humidity. We found little evidence of association between daily RSV admission rates and exposure to ambient NO at different lags or average exposure across several lags. The findings should, however, be viewed with caution due to the low number of events observed during the time frame. It is possible that the apparent lack of association may be accounted for by the timing of the seasonal RSV epidemic in relation to peaks in NO concentrations. A larger study incorporating a wider range of RSV and NO peaks would determine whether said peaks enhanced the number of RSV hospitalizations in children.
    Original languageEnglish
    JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
    Volume13
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

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    Bronchiolitis
    Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
    Nitric Oxide
    Hospitalization
    Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
    Humidity
    Switzerland
    Cross-Over Studies
    Air
    Temperature

    Cite this

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    title = "A preliminary assessment of the role of ambient nitric oxide exposure in hospitalization with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.Some in vitro studies have indicated a possible link between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and exposure to Nitric Oxide (NO). However, these studies used much higher NO concentrations than normally found in the ambient environment. This preliminary study explored whether an association was present with short-term exposure to NO in the environment. RSV-related admission data between November 2011 and February 2012 were obtained from Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The dates of admission were linked to contemporaneous ambient NO derived from sentinel air monitors. The case-crossover design was used to study the relationship between daily RSV admissions and NO, controlling for temperature and relative humidity. We found little evidence of association between daily RSV admission rates and exposure to ambient NO at different lags or average exposure across several lags. The findings should, however, be viewed with caution due to the low number of events observed during the time frame. It is possible that the apparent lack of association may be accounted for by the timing of the seasonal RSV epidemic in relation to peaks in NO concentrations. A larger study incorporating a wider range of RSV and NO peaks would determine whether said peaks enhanced the number of RSV hospitalizations in children.",
    author = "N.I. Mohammed and Everard, {Mark L.} and J.G. Ayres and N.J. Barker and I.J. Litchfield",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.3390/ijerph13060578",
    language = "English",
    volume = "13",
    journal = "International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health",
    issn = "1660-4601",
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    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A preliminary assessment of the role of ambient nitric oxide exposure in hospitalization with respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis

    AU - Mohammed, N.I.

    AU - Everard, Mark L.

    AU - Ayres, J.G.

    AU - Barker, N.J.

    AU - Litchfield, I.J.

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.Some in vitro studies have indicated a possible link between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and exposure to Nitric Oxide (NO). However, these studies used much higher NO concentrations than normally found in the ambient environment. This preliminary study explored whether an association was present with short-term exposure to NO in the environment. RSV-related admission data between November 2011 and February 2012 were obtained from Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The dates of admission were linked to contemporaneous ambient NO derived from sentinel air monitors. The case-crossover design was used to study the relationship between daily RSV admissions and NO, controlling for temperature and relative humidity. We found little evidence of association between daily RSV admission rates and exposure to ambient NO at different lags or average exposure across several lags. The findings should, however, be viewed with caution due to the low number of events observed during the time frame. It is possible that the apparent lack of association may be accounted for by the timing of the seasonal RSV epidemic in relation to peaks in NO concentrations. A larger study incorporating a wider range of RSV and NO peaks would determine whether said peaks enhanced the number of RSV hospitalizations in children.

    AB - © 2016 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.Some in vitro studies have indicated a possible link between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and exposure to Nitric Oxide (NO). However, these studies used much higher NO concentrations than normally found in the ambient environment. This preliminary study explored whether an association was present with short-term exposure to NO in the environment. RSV-related admission data between November 2011 and February 2012 were obtained from Sheffield Children’s Hospital. The dates of admission were linked to contemporaneous ambient NO derived from sentinel air monitors. The case-crossover design was used to study the relationship between daily RSV admissions and NO, controlling for temperature and relative humidity. We found little evidence of association between daily RSV admission rates and exposure to ambient NO at different lags or average exposure across several lags. The findings should, however, be viewed with caution due to the low number of events observed during the time frame. It is possible that the apparent lack of association may be accounted for by the timing of the seasonal RSV epidemic in relation to peaks in NO concentrations. A larger study incorporating a wider range of RSV and NO peaks would determine whether said peaks enhanced the number of RSV hospitalizations in children.

    U2 - 10.3390/ijerph13060578

    DO - 10.3390/ijerph13060578

    M3 - Article

    VL - 13

    JO - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

    JF - International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

    SN - 1660-4601

    IS - 6

    ER -