A population-based study of the association between dysglycaemia and hearing loss in middle age

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Abstract

Aims: To investigate the independent associations between hearing loss and dysglycaemia in a sample of middle-aged adults, including separate analysis of those aged <60 years. Methods: The first 2023 participants in the cross-sectional Busselton Health Ageing Survey were assessed for hearing loss ≥ 26 dB (better ear) for four-frequency average (4FA) of pure-tone thresholds at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz, and high-frequency average (HFA) of pure-tone thresholds at 4000 and 8000 Hz. Results: Valid data from 1864 participants in the Busselton Health Ageing Survey [92.1%; mean ± sd age 56.2 ± 5.5 years, 46.0% men, 120 (7.0%) with diabetes, 274 (14.7%) with prediabetes] were analysed, of whom 103 (5.5%) had four-frequency average hearing loss and 561 (30.1%) had high-frequency average hearing loss. In multivariable analyses, glycaemic status was not independently associated with four-frequency or high-frequency average hearing loss. In the 1286 participants aged <60 years, there was no relationship between dysglycaemia and high-frequency average hearing loss, but the prevalence of four-frequency average hearing loss increased from 2.3% (95% CI 1.5-3.4) in participants with normoglycaemia to 5.7% (95% CI 3.0-10.6) in those with prediabetes and 10.2% (4.2-21.5) in those with diabetes (trend P = 0.003). In multivariable analysis with normoglycaemia as reference, the odds ratios for four-frequency average hearing loss were 2.84 (95% CI 1.29-6.27) for prediabetes and 5.93 (95% CI 1.67-21.05) for diabetes (P ≤ 0.01) in the <60 year age group. Conclusions: There was progressively increasing mid-range hearing loss with worsening glucose tolerance in younger individuals, suggesting dysglycaemia-associated early-onset presbycusis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)683-690
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume34
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Feb 2017

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Hearing Loss
High-Frequency Hearing Loss
Prediabetic State
Population
Health Surveys
Presbycusis
Ear
Age Groups
Odds Ratio
Glucose

Cite this

@article{ed1cce93f4ee4f8288a721a071a0c8f1,
title = "A population-based study of the association between dysglycaemia and hearing loss in middle age",
abstract = "Aims: To investigate the independent associations between hearing loss and dysglycaemia in a sample of middle-aged adults, including separate analysis of those aged <60 years. Methods: The first 2023 participants in the cross-sectional Busselton Health Ageing Survey were assessed for hearing loss ≥ 26 dB (better ear) for four-frequency average (4FA) of pure-tone thresholds at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz, and high-frequency average (HFA) of pure-tone thresholds at 4000 and 8000 Hz. Results: Valid data from 1864 participants in the Busselton Health Ageing Survey [92.1{\%}; mean ± sd age 56.2 ± 5.5 years, 46.0{\%} men, 120 (7.0{\%}) with diabetes, 274 (14.7{\%}) with prediabetes] were analysed, of whom 103 (5.5{\%}) had four-frequency average hearing loss and 561 (30.1{\%}) had high-frequency average hearing loss. In multivariable analyses, glycaemic status was not independently associated with four-frequency or high-frequency average hearing loss. In the 1286 participants aged <60 years, there was no relationship between dysglycaemia and high-frequency average hearing loss, but the prevalence of four-frequency average hearing loss increased from 2.3{\%} (95{\%} CI 1.5-3.4) in participants with normoglycaemia to 5.7{\%} (95{\%} CI 3.0-10.6) in those with prediabetes and 10.2{\%} (4.2-21.5) in those with diabetes (trend P = 0.003). In multivariable analysis with normoglycaemia as reference, the odds ratios for four-frequency average hearing loss were 2.84 (95{\%} CI 1.29-6.27) for prediabetes and 5.93 (95{\%} CI 1.67-21.05) for diabetes (P ≤ 0.01) in the <60 year age group. Conclusions: There was progressively increasing mid-range hearing loss with worsening glucose tolerance in younger individuals, suggesting dysglycaemia-associated early-onset presbycusis.",
author = "J. Sommer and Brennan-Jones, {C. G.} and Eikelboom, {R. H.} and M. Hunter and Davis, {W. A.} and Atlas, {M. D.} and Davis, {T. M E}",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "20",
doi = "10.1111/dme.13320",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "683--690",
journal = "Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK",
issn = "0742-3071",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
number = "5",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - A population-based study of the association between dysglycaemia and hearing loss in middle age

AU - Sommer, J.

AU - Brennan-Jones, C. G.

AU - Eikelboom, R. H.

AU - Hunter, M.

AU - Davis, W. A.

AU - Atlas, M. D.

AU - Davis, T. M E

PY - 2017/2/20

Y1 - 2017/2/20

N2 - Aims: To investigate the independent associations between hearing loss and dysglycaemia in a sample of middle-aged adults, including separate analysis of those aged <60 years. Methods: The first 2023 participants in the cross-sectional Busselton Health Ageing Survey were assessed for hearing loss ≥ 26 dB (better ear) for four-frequency average (4FA) of pure-tone thresholds at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz, and high-frequency average (HFA) of pure-tone thresholds at 4000 and 8000 Hz. Results: Valid data from 1864 participants in the Busselton Health Ageing Survey [92.1%; mean ± sd age 56.2 ± 5.5 years, 46.0% men, 120 (7.0%) with diabetes, 274 (14.7%) with prediabetes] were analysed, of whom 103 (5.5%) had four-frequency average hearing loss and 561 (30.1%) had high-frequency average hearing loss. In multivariable analyses, glycaemic status was not independently associated with four-frequency or high-frequency average hearing loss. In the 1286 participants aged <60 years, there was no relationship between dysglycaemia and high-frequency average hearing loss, but the prevalence of four-frequency average hearing loss increased from 2.3% (95% CI 1.5-3.4) in participants with normoglycaemia to 5.7% (95% CI 3.0-10.6) in those with prediabetes and 10.2% (4.2-21.5) in those with diabetes (trend P = 0.003). In multivariable analysis with normoglycaemia as reference, the odds ratios for four-frequency average hearing loss were 2.84 (95% CI 1.29-6.27) for prediabetes and 5.93 (95% CI 1.67-21.05) for diabetes (P ≤ 0.01) in the <60 year age group. Conclusions: There was progressively increasing mid-range hearing loss with worsening glucose tolerance in younger individuals, suggesting dysglycaemia-associated early-onset presbycusis.

AB - Aims: To investigate the independent associations between hearing loss and dysglycaemia in a sample of middle-aged adults, including separate analysis of those aged <60 years. Methods: The first 2023 participants in the cross-sectional Busselton Health Ageing Survey were assessed for hearing loss ≥ 26 dB (better ear) for four-frequency average (4FA) of pure-tone thresholds at 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 Hz, and high-frequency average (HFA) of pure-tone thresholds at 4000 and 8000 Hz. Results: Valid data from 1864 participants in the Busselton Health Ageing Survey [92.1%; mean ± sd age 56.2 ± 5.5 years, 46.0% men, 120 (7.0%) with diabetes, 274 (14.7%) with prediabetes] were analysed, of whom 103 (5.5%) had four-frequency average hearing loss and 561 (30.1%) had high-frequency average hearing loss. In multivariable analyses, glycaemic status was not independently associated with four-frequency or high-frequency average hearing loss. In the 1286 participants aged <60 years, there was no relationship between dysglycaemia and high-frequency average hearing loss, but the prevalence of four-frequency average hearing loss increased from 2.3% (95% CI 1.5-3.4) in participants with normoglycaemia to 5.7% (95% CI 3.0-10.6) in those with prediabetes and 10.2% (4.2-21.5) in those with diabetes (trend P = 0.003). In multivariable analysis with normoglycaemia as reference, the odds ratios for four-frequency average hearing loss were 2.84 (95% CI 1.29-6.27) for prediabetes and 5.93 (95% CI 1.67-21.05) for diabetes (P ≤ 0.01) in the <60 year age group. Conclusions: There was progressively increasing mid-range hearing loss with worsening glucose tolerance in younger individuals, suggesting dysglycaemia-associated early-onset presbycusis.

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U2 - 10.1111/dme.13320

DO - 10.1111/dme.13320

M3 - Article

VL - 34

SP - 683

EP - 690

JO - Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK

JF - Diabetic Medicine: journal of diabetes UK

SN - 0742-3071

IS - 5

ER -