A pilot study to assess the validity of the DASS-21 subscales in an outpatient oncology population

Claire E. Johnson, Kellie S. Bennett, Jade Newton, Joseph McTigue, Scott Taylor, Toni Musiello, Peter K.H. Lau

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Given the high prevalence of emotional disorders within patients withcancer, identifying these comorbidities is essential in providing patientcentric care within a multidisciplinary team environment. TheDepression Anxiety Stress Scale Short Form (DASS)‐21 is an empiri-cally developed self‐report measure which assesses anxiety, depres-sion and stress. The conceptual basis of DASS is a tripartite model1comprising 3 subscales: anxiety (DASS‐A—autonomic arousal,physiological hyperarousal, and situational anxiety), depression(DASS‐D—anhedonia, hopelessness, and dysphoria) and stress(DASS‐S—nondiscriminating anxiety and depression items that pre-dominantly consisted of tension, nervous arousal, and irritability) andprovides a global measure of psychological distress.

    Because of the positive psychometric properties and ease of use,1the DASS‐21 is increasingly used in a cross section of oncology set-tings to assess psychological distress but has not been validated inthe cancer population. Our study aimed to examine the assumptions of the structure ofthe DASS‐21 within a cancer population actively receiving chemother-apy treatment in an outpatient setting and evaluate its psychometric properties.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-5
    Number of pages5
    JournalPsycho-Oncology
    Volume27
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Apr 2017

    Fingerprint

    Outpatients
    Anxiety
    Population
    Arousal
    Psychometrics
    Tolnaftate
    Depression
    Psychology
    Comorbidity
    Neoplasms
    Therapeutics

    Cite this

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    title = "A pilot study to assess the validity of the DASS-21 subscales in an outpatient oncology population",
    abstract = "Given the high prevalence of emotional disorders within patients withcancer, identifying these comorbidities is essential in providing patientcentric care within a multidisciplinary team environment. TheDepression Anxiety Stress Scale Short Form (DASS)‐21 is an empiri-cally developed self‐report measure which assesses anxiety, depres-sion and stress. The conceptual basis of DASS is a tripartite model1comprising 3 subscales: anxiety (DASS‐A—autonomic arousal,physiological hyperarousal, and situational anxiety), depression(DASS‐D—anhedonia, hopelessness, and dysphoria) and stress(DASS‐S—nondiscriminating anxiety and depression items that pre-dominantly consisted of tension, nervous arousal, and irritability) andprovides a global measure of psychological distress.Because of the positive psychometric properties and ease of use,1the DASS‐21 is increasingly used in a cross section of oncology set-tings to assess psychological distress but has not been validated inthe cancer population. Our study aimed to examine the assumptions of the structure ofthe DASS‐21 within a cancer population actively receiving chemother-apy treatment in an outpatient setting and evaluate its psychometric properties.",
    author = "Johnson, {Claire E.} and Bennett, {Kellie S.} and Jade Newton and Joseph McTigue and Scott Taylor and Toni Musiello and Lau, {Peter K.H.}",
    year = "2017",
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    doi = "10.1002/pon.4435",
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    A pilot study to assess the validity of the DASS-21 subscales in an outpatient oncology population. / Johnson, Claire E.; Bennett, Kellie S.; Newton, Jade; McTigue, Joseph ; Taylor, Scott ; Musiello, Toni; Lau, Peter K.H.

    In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 27, No. 2, 18.04.2017, p. 1-5.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    AU - Johnson, Claire E.

    AU - Bennett, Kellie S.

    AU - Newton, Jade

    AU - McTigue, Joseph

    AU - Taylor, Scott

    AU - Musiello, Toni

    AU - Lau, Peter K.H.

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    AB - Given the high prevalence of emotional disorders within patients withcancer, identifying these comorbidities is essential in providing patientcentric care within a multidisciplinary team environment. TheDepression Anxiety Stress Scale Short Form (DASS)‐21 is an empiri-cally developed self‐report measure which assesses anxiety, depres-sion and stress. The conceptual basis of DASS is a tripartite model1comprising 3 subscales: anxiety (DASS‐A—autonomic arousal,physiological hyperarousal, and situational anxiety), depression(DASS‐D—anhedonia, hopelessness, and dysphoria) and stress(DASS‐S—nondiscriminating anxiety and depression items that pre-dominantly consisted of tension, nervous arousal, and irritability) andprovides a global measure of psychological distress.Because of the positive psychometric properties and ease of use,1the DASS‐21 is increasingly used in a cross section of oncology set-tings to assess psychological distress but has not been validated inthe cancer population. Our study aimed to examine the assumptions of the structure ofthe DASS‐21 within a cancer population actively receiving chemother-apy treatment in an outpatient setting and evaluate its psychometric properties.

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