A method for approximate prediction of extrudate swell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The extrudate swell problem is modeled as the stratified flow of two Newtonian isothermal fluids with differing viscosities. If the viscosity of the thin outer layer is the greater of the two, then enhanced swelling relative to the case of equal viscosity is observed. By suitable selection of the the viscosity ratio, this model can be used to represent thermal, shear-thinning, and elastic effects in extrusion. The stratifled flow problem is solved using an efficient boundary element method. The model then provides a means of studying and predicting complex geometrical effects in profile extrusion without the burden of a full viscoelastic solution, which may yield a practical aid to the die design process.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)950-958
    JournalPolymer Engineering and Science
    Volume33
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1993

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    Viscosity
    Extrusion
    Viscoelastic Substances
    Shear thinning
    Boundary element method
    Swelling
    Fluids
    Hot Temperature

    Cite this

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    title = "A method for approximate prediction of extrudate swell",
    abstract = "The extrudate swell problem is modeled as the stratified flow of two Newtonian isothermal fluids with differing viscosities. If the viscosity of the thin outer layer is the greater of the two, then enhanced swelling relative to the case of equal viscosity is observed. By suitable selection of the the viscosity ratio, this model can be used to represent thermal, shear-thinning, and elastic effects in extrusion. The stratifled flow problem is solved using an efficient boundary element method. The model then provides a means of studying and predicting complex geometrical effects in profile extrusion without the burden of a full viscoelastic solution, which may yield a practical aid to the die design process.",
    author = "Mark Bush",
    year = "1993",
    doi = "10.1002/pen.760331504",
    language = "English",
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    pages = "950--958",
    journal = "Polymer Engineering and Science",
    issn = "0032-3888",
    publisher = "SOC PLASTICS ENG INC",

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    A method for approximate prediction of extrudate swell. / Bush, Mark.

    In: Polymer Engineering and Science, Vol. 33, 1993, p. 950-958.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A method for approximate prediction of extrudate swell

    AU - Bush, Mark

    PY - 1993

    Y1 - 1993

    N2 - The extrudate swell problem is modeled as the stratified flow of two Newtonian isothermal fluids with differing viscosities. If the viscosity of the thin outer layer is the greater of the two, then enhanced swelling relative to the case of equal viscosity is observed. By suitable selection of the the viscosity ratio, this model can be used to represent thermal, shear-thinning, and elastic effects in extrusion. The stratifled flow problem is solved using an efficient boundary element method. The model then provides a means of studying and predicting complex geometrical effects in profile extrusion without the burden of a full viscoelastic solution, which may yield a practical aid to the die design process.

    AB - The extrudate swell problem is modeled as the stratified flow of two Newtonian isothermal fluids with differing viscosities. If the viscosity of the thin outer layer is the greater of the two, then enhanced swelling relative to the case of equal viscosity is observed. By suitable selection of the the viscosity ratio, this model can be used to represent thermal, shear-thinning, and elastic effects in extrusion. The stratifled flow problem is solved using an efficient boundary element method. The model then provides a means of studying and predicting complex geometrical effects in profile extrusion without the burden of a full viscoelastic solution, which may yield a practical aid to the die design process.

    U2 - 10.1002/pen.760331504

    DO - 10.1002/pen.760331504

    M3 - Article

    VL - 33

    SP - 950

    EP - 958

    JO - Polymer Engineering and Science

    JF - Polymer Engineering and Science

    SN - 0032-3888

    ER -