A landscape-scale assessment of fire severity and flowering of the eucalypt species Corymbia calophylla of southwest Australia

Daniel Dixon

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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Abstract

This thesis develops remote sensing tools to better understand forest reproduction and fire ecology in southwest Australia. A modelling framework was applied to the eucalypt forest species Corymbia calophylla. It consists of three models to 1) detect crown-scale C. calophylla flowering across the landscape and 2) produce a 16-year history of gridded fire severity. The outputs of these models were used to 3) isolate and estimate the causal effects of fire on C. calophylla flowering. Understanding the negative effects of fire on a species' reproduction will be essential to maintaining forests and all that they provide.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • The University of Western Australia
Supervisors/Advisors
  • Callow, Nik, Supervisor
  • Duncan, John, Supervisor
  • Setterfield, Samantha, Supervisor
  • Pauli, Natasha, Supervisor
Thesis sponsors
Award date5 Dec 2022
DOIs
Publication statusUnpublished - 2022

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