A lack of aerenchyma and high rates of radial oxygen loss from the root base contribute to the waterlogging intolerance of Brassica napus

L.A.C. Voesenek, W. Armstrong, G.M. Bogemann, M.P. Mcdonald, Tim Colmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The morphology and physiology of the response of two cultivars of Brassica napus to an anaerobic root medium was investigated. The cultivars Chikuzen and Topas showed a large reduction in growth rate when their roots were exposed to a de-oxygenated stagnant nutrient solution containing 0.1% w/v agar. Older seedlings (11 d old) were more sensitive to stagnant agar, expressed as biomass accumulation, than younger ones (5 d old). Brassica napus was characterized by a constitutively low root porosity (3-5%), typical for plant species with a low tolerance to waterlogging. A hypoxia pretreatment (16 h; 2.25% O-2) before exposure to de-oxygenated stagnant agar had no effect on the final number or length of lateral roots and adventitious roots. Brassica napus cv. Chikuzen is characterized by radial oxygen loss being most at the basal portion of the root, when a strong oxygen sink surrounds the root. Oxygen profiles through laterals of Brassica napus cv. Chikuzen show a typical pattern with low oxygen concentrations in the stele and somewhat higher levers in the cortex. Despite the continuum of intercellular air spaces in the root cortical tissue the lack of aerenchyma and therefore low rates of internal oxygen diffusion restricts root growth in anaerobic media and presumably contributes to the sensitivity of Brassica napus to waterlogging.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-93
JournalAustralian Journal Plant Physiology
Volume26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

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