A honeycomb-like porous banana peel derived activated carbons for the adsorption of CO2

Arash Arami Niya, Thomas E. Rufford, Zhonghua Zhu

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

Abstract

A cost-effective approach to obtain carbon adsorbents is using abundant available agricultural wastes such as banana peel (BP) as a precursor. Here we report the preparation of a three-dimensional (3D) honeycomb-like porous carbon by the simple carbonization of banana peel at 873 K followed by CO2 activation at 1023 K and 1123 K for 1 hour or 3 hours. The effect of the carbonization process as well as activation stage on the macro-structure and the micropore structure of the carbon were studied. Carbonization provides semi-developed open channel structure featuring cell wider than 10 μm (SEM observation) and micropore volume of 0.14 m3.g-1 (determined from sorption isotherms of CO2 at 273 K). Further activation developed large honeycomb porosity and improved the microporosity of the carbon product to provide a BET specific surface area of 204.3 m2.g-1 and micropore volume of 0.27 m3.g-1 determined from sorption isotherms of N2 at 77 K and CO2 at 273 K, respectively. To evaluate the potential of these carbon structures as adsorbents for gas separation, the adsorption capacity of the carbons for CO2 and N2 were measured by the volumetric sorption method at pressures up to 130 kPa and 303 K. At the highest pressure, CO2 adsorption capacity was 0.907 mmol.g-1 for the final structured activated carbon while the N2 adsorption capacity was 0.079 mmol.g-1. The good selectivity of CO2 over N2, makes the biomass based AC as a good candidate for CO2 capture applications.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationChemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherEngineers Australia
Pages1079-1084
ISBN (Print)9781922107831
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Activated carbon
Carbon
Adsorption
Carbonization
Sorption
Chemical activation
Adsorbents
Isotherms
Agricultural wastes
Microporosity
Specific surface area
Macros
Biomass
Porosity
Gases
Scanning electron microscopy
Costs

Cite this

Arami Niya, A., Rufford, T. E., & Zhu, Z. (2016). A honeycomb-like porous banana peel derived activated carbons for the adsorption of CO2. In Chemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention (pp. 1079-1084). Melbourne: Engineers Australia.
Arami Niya, Arash ; Rufford, Thomas E. ; Zhu, Zhonghua . / A honeycomb-like porous banana peel derived activated carbons for the adsorption of CO2. Chemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention. Melbourne : Engineers Australia, 2016. pp. 1079-1084
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Arami Niya, A, Rufford, TE & Zhu, Z 2016, A honeycomb-like porous banana peel derived activated carbons for the adsorption of CO2. in Chemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention. Engineers Australia, Melbourne, pp. 1079-1084.

A honeycomb-like porous banana peel derived activated carbons for the adsorption of CO2. / Arami Niya, Arash; Rufford, Thomas E.; Zhu, Zhonghua .

Chemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention. Melbourne : Engineers Australia, 2016. p. 1079-1084.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

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N2 - A cost-effective approach to obtain carbon adsorbents is using abundant available agricultural wastes such as banana peel (BP) as a precursor. Here we report the preparation of a three-dimensional (3D) honeycomb-like porous carbon by the simple carbonization of banana peel at 873 K followed by CO2 activation at 1023 K and 1123 K for 1 hour or 3 hours. The effect of the carbonization process as well as activation stage on the macro-structure and the micropore structure of the carbon were studied. Carbonization provides semi-developed open channel structure featuring cell wider than 10 μm (SEM observation) and micropore volume of 0.14 m3.g-1 (determined from sorption isotherms of CO2 at 273 K). Further activation developed large honeycomb porosity and improved the microporosity of the carbon product to provide a BET specific surface area of 204.3 m2.g-1 and micropore volume of 0.27 m3.g-1 determined from sorption isotherms of N2 at 77 K and CO2 at 273 K, respectively. To evaluate the potential of these carbon structures as adsorbents for gas separation, the adsorption capacity of the carbons for CO2 and N2 were measured by the volumetric sorption method at pressures up to 130 kPa and 303 K. At the highest pressure, CO2 adsorption capacity was 0.907 mmol.g-1 for the final structured activated carbon while the N2 adsorption capacity was 0.079 mmol.g-1. The good selectivity of CO2 over N2, makes the biomass based AC as a good candidate for CO2 capture applications.

AB - A cost-effective approach to obtain carbon adsorbents is using abundant available agricultural wastes such as banana peel (BP) as a precursor. Here we report the preparation of a three-dimensional (3D) honeycomb-like porous carbon by the simple carbonization of banana peel at 873 K followed by CO2 activation at 1023 K and 1123 K for 1 hour or 3 hours. The effect of the carbonization process as well as activation stage on the macro-structure and the micropore structure of the carbon were studied. Carbonization provides semi-developed open channel structure featuring cell wider than 10 μm (SEM observation) and micropore volume of 0.14 m3.g-1 (determined from sorption isotherms of CO2 at 273 K). Further activation developed large honeycomb porosity and improved the microporosity of the carbon product to provide a BET specific surface area of 204.3 m2.g-1 and micropore volume of 0.27 m3.g-1 determined from sorption isotherms of N2 at 77 K and CO2 at 273 K, respectively. To evaluate the potential of these carbon structures as adsorbents for gas separation, the adsorption capacity of the carbons for CO2 and N2 were measured by the volumetric sorption method at pressures up to 130 kPa and 303 K. At the highest pressure, CO2 adsorption capacity was 0.907 mmol.g-1 for the final structured activated carbon while the N2 adsorption capacity was 0.079 mmol.g-1. The good selectivity of CO2 over N2, makes the biomass based AC as a good candidate for CO2 capture applications.

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Arami Niya A, Rufford TE, Zhu Z. A honeycomb-like porous banana peel derived activated carbons for the adsorption of CO2. In Chemeca 2016: Chemical Engineering - Regeneration, Recovery and Reinvention. Melbourne: Engineers Australia. 2016. p. 1079-1084