A hierarchical ZnO nanostructure gas sensor for human breath-level acetone detection

J. Chen, X. Pan, Farid Boussaid, A. Bermak, Z. Fan

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference paperConference paper

    4 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2016 IEEE.Analyzing the concentration of acetone in human breath constitutes a promising non-invasive means to diagnose the onset of diabetes, with acetone levels of at least 1.8ppm typically associated to individuals suffering from diabetes. In this paper, we report the performance of a hierarchical ZnO nanostructure gas sensor for acetone detection. The fabricated gas sensor can detect concentrations as low as 1ppm while operating at a comparatively lower temperature of 200°C. In addition, the proposed gas sensor can be fabricated on a silicon wafer using a MEMS process, making it thereby possible to fully integrate gas sensing and electronic circuitry on a single silicon chip.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems
    EditorsM Sawan
    PublisherIEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
    Pages1866-1869
    Number of pages4
    Volume2016-July
    ISBN (Print)9781479953400
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016
    Event2016 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, ISCAS 2016 - Montreal, Canada
    Duration: 22 May 201625 May 2016

    Conference

    Conference2016 IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems, ISCAS 2016
    CountryCanada
    CityMontreal
    Period22/05/1625/05/16

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  • Cite this

    Chen, J., Pan, X., Boussaid, F., Bermak, A., & Fan, Z. (2016). A hierarchical ZnO nanostructure gas sensor for human breath-level acetone detection. In M. Sawan (Ed.), Proceedings - IEEE International Symposium on Circuits and Systems (Vol. 2016-July, pp. 1866-1869). IEEE, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. https://doi.org/10.1109/ISCAS.2016.7538935