A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination

Lucinda J. Black, Charlotte Rowley, Jill Sherriff, Gavin Pereira, Anne Louise Ponsonby, Robyn M. Lucas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The evidence associating diet and risk of multiple sclerosis is inconclusive. Objective: We investigated associations between dietary patterns and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, a common precursor to multiple sclerosis. Methods: We used data from the 2003–2006 Ausimmune Study, a case–control study examining environmental risk factors for a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, with participants matched on age, sex and study region. Using data from a food frequency questionnaire, dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Conditional logistic regression models (n = 698, 252 cases, 446 controls) were adjusted for history of infectious mononucleosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, smoking, race, education, body mass index and dietary misreporting. Results: We identified two major dietary patterns – healthy (high in poultry, fish, eggs, vegetables, legumes) and Western (high in meat, full-fat dairy; low in wholegrains, nuts, fresh fruit, low-fat dairy), explaining 9.3% and 7.5% of variability in diet, respectively. A one-standard deviation increase in the healthy pattern score was associated with a 25% reduced risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (adjusted odds ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.60, 0.94; p = 0.011). There was no statistically significant association between the Western dietary pattern and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination. Conclusion: Following healthy eating guidelines may be beneficial for those at high risk of multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1514-1525
Number of pages12
JournalMultiple Sclerosis Journal
Volume25
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Demyelinating Diseases
Central Nervous System
Multiple Sclerosis
Logistic Models
Fats
Diet
Infectious Mononucleosis
Nuts
Poultry
Principal Component Analysis
Fabaceae
Vegetables
Meat
Eggs
Fruit
Fishes
Body Mass Index
Smoking
Odds Ratio
Guidelines

Cite this

Black, Lucinda J. ; Rowley, Charlotte ; Sherriff, Jill ; Pereira, Gavin ; Ponsonby, Anne Louise ; Lucas, Robyn M. / A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination. In: Multiple Sclerosis Journal. 2019 ; Vol. 25, No. 11. pp. 1514-1525.
@article{dd3ca45326ee43db87d81da281d5a082,
title = "A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination",
abstract = "Background: The evidence associating diet and risk of multiple sclerosis is inconclusive. Objective: We investigated associations between dietary patterns and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, a common precursor to multiple sclerosis. Methods: We used data from the 2003–2006 Ausimmune Study, a case–control study examining environmental risk factors for a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, with participants matched on age, sex and study region. Using data from a food frequency questionnaire, dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Conditional logistic regression models (n = 698, 252 cases, 446 controls) were adjusted for history of infectious mononucleosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, smoking, race, education, body mass index and dietary misreporting. Results: We identified two major dietary patterns – healthy (high in poultry, fish, eggs, vegetables, legumes) and Western (high in meat, full-fat dairy; low in wholegrains, nuts, fresh fruit, low-fat dairy), explaining 9.3{\%} and 7.5{\%} of variability in diet, respectively. A one-standard deviation increase in the healthy pattern score was associated with a 25{\%} reduced risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (adjusted odds ratio 0.75; 95{\%} confidence interval 0.60, 0.94; p = 0.011). There was no statistically significant association between the Western dietary pattern and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination. Conclusion: Following healthy eating guidelines may be beneficial for those at high risk of multiple sclerosis.",
keywords = "Ausimmune Study, diet, dietary patterns, food, Multiple sclerosis, nutrition",
author = "Black, {Lucinda J.} and Charlotte Rowley and Jill Sherriff and Gavin Pereira and Ponsonby, {Anne Louise} and Lucas, {Robyn M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1352458518793524",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "1514--1525",
journal = "Multiple Sclerosis",
issn = "1352-4585",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "11",

}

A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination. / Black, Lucinda J.; Rowley, Charlotte; Sherriff, Jill; Pereira, Gavin; Ponsonby, Anne Louise; Lucas, Robyn M.

In: Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Vol. 25, No. 11, 01.10.2019, p. 1514-1525.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - A healthy dietary pattern associates with a lower risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination

AU - Black, Lucinda J.

AU - Rowley, Charlotte

AU - Sherriff, Jill

AU - Pereira, Gavin

AU - Ponsonby, Anne Louise

AU - Lucas, Robyn M.

PY - 2019/10/1

Y1 - 2019/10/1

N2 - Background: The evidence associating diet and risk of multiple sclerosis is inconclusive. Objective: We investigated associations between dietary patterns and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, a common precursor to multiple sclerosis. Methods: We used data from the 2003–2006 Ausimmune Study, a case–control study examining environmental risk factors for a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, with participants matched on age, sex and study region. Using data from a food frequency questionnaire, dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Conditional logistic regression models (n = 698, 252 cases, 446 controls) were adjusted for history of infectious mononucleosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, smoking, race, education, body mass index and dietary misreporting. Results: We identified two major dietary patterns – healthy (high in poultry, fish, eggs, vegetables, legumes) and Western (high in meat, full-fat dairy; low in wholegrains, nuts, fresh fruit, low-fat dairy), explaining 9.3% and 7.5% of variability in diet, respectively. A one-standard deviation increase in the healthy pattern score was associated with a 25% reduced risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (adjusted odds ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.60, 0.94; p = 0.011). There was no statistically significant association between the Western dietary pattern and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination. Conclusion: Following healthy eating guidelines may be beneficial for those at high risk of multiple sclerosis.

AB - Background: The evidence associating diet and risk of multiple sclerosis is inconclusive. Objective: We investigated associations between dietary patterns and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, a common precursor to multiple sclerosis. Methods: We used data from the 2003–2006 Ausimmune Study, a case–control study examining environmental risk factors for a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination, with participants matched on age, sex and study region. Using data from a food frequency questionnaire, dietary patterns were identified using principal component analysis. Conditional logistic regression models (n = 698, 252 cases, 446 controls) were adjusted for history of infectious mononucleosis, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, smoking, race, education, body mass index and dietary misreporting. Results: We identified two major dietary patterns – healthy (high in poultry, fish, eggs, vegetables, legumes) and Western (high in meat, full-fat dairy; low in wholegrains, nuts, fresh fruit, low-fat dairy), explaining 9.3% and 7.5% of variability in diet, respectively. A one-standard deviation increase in the healthy pattern score was associated with a 25% reduced risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination (adjusted odds ratio 0.75; 95% confidence interval 0.60, 0.94; p = 0.011). There was no statistically significant association between the Western dietary pattern and risk of a first clinical diagnosis of central nervous system demyelination. Conclusion: Following healthy eating guidelines may be beneficial for those at high risk of multiple sclerosis.

KW - Ausimmune Study

KW - diet

KW - dietary patterns

KW - food

KW - Multiple sclerosis

KW - nutrition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85052502037&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1352458518793524

DO - 10.1177/1352458518793524

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 1514

EP - 1525

JO - Multiple Sclerosis

JF - Multiple Sclerosis

SN - 1352-4585

IS - 11

ER -