A Gelatin liver phantom of suspended 90Y resin microspheres to simulate the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver

Y. Kao, O.S. Luddington, S.R. Culleton, Roslyn Francis, J.A. Boucek

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc. For phantom studies involving 90Y PET/CT, homogeneous solutions of 90Y, for example, 90Y citrate, are commonly used. However, the microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is never homogeneous; therefore, such phantoms are physiologically unrealistic for simulating clinical scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop a safe and practical phantom capable of simulating the heterogeneous microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver. Methods: Gelatin (5%) was used to suspend 90Y resin microspheres, poured into plastic containers to simulate a liver with 2 tumors. Microspheres were added while the gelatin was maintained in a liquid state on a hot plate and continuously stirred with magnetic stir bars. The liquid microsphere mixture was then rapidly cooled in an ice bath while being stirred, resulting in a heterogeneous suspension of microspheres. The completed phantom was serially scanned by 90Y PET/CT over 2 wk. Results: All scans demonstrated a heterogeneous microsphere distribution throughout the liver and tumor inserts. Serendipitously, magnetic stir bars left inside the phantom produced CT artifacts similar to those caused by embolization coils, whereas pockets of air trapped within the gelatin during its preparation mimicked gas within hollow viscus. The microspheres and tumor inserts remained fixed and suspended within the gelatin, with no evidence of breakdown or leakage. Conclusion: A gelatin phantom realistically simulating the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is feasible to construct in a radiopharmacy.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)265-268
    JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine Technology
    Volume42
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    Gelatin
    Microspheres
    Liver
    Neoplasms
    Molecular Imaging
    Viscera
    Ice
    Baths
    Citric Acid
    Artifacts
    Plastics
    Suspensions
    Gases
    Air

    Cite this

    @article{6a9dda134ba54580a047fe6b799a0be5,
    title = "A Gelatin liver phantom of suspended 90Y resin microspheres to simulate the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver",
    abstract = "{\circledC} 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc. For phantom studies involving 90Y PET/CT, homogeneous solutions of 90Y, for example, 90Y citrate, are commonly used. However, the microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is never homogeneous; therefore, such phantoms are physiologically unrealistic for simulating clinical scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop a safe and practical phantom capable of simulating the heterogeneous microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver. Methods: Gelatin (5{\%}) was used to suspend 90Y resin microspheres, poured into plastic containers to simulate a liver with 2 tumors. Microspheres were added while the gelatin was maintained in a liquid state on a hot plate and continuously stirred with magnetic stir bars. The liquid microsphere mixture was then rapidly cooled in an ice bath while being stirred, resulting in a heterogeneous suspension of microspheres. The completed phantom was serially scanned by 90Y PET/CT over 2 wk. Results: All scans demonstrated a heterogeneous microsphere distribution throughout the liver and tumor inserts. Serendipitously, magnetic stir bars left inside the phantom produced CT artifacts similar to those caused by embolization coils, whereas pockets of air trapped within the gelatin during its preparation mimicked gas within hollow viscus. The microspheres and tumor inserts remained fixed and suspended within the gelatin, with no evidence of breakdown or leakage. Conclusion: A gelatin phantom realistically simulating the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is feasible to construct in a radiopharmacy.",
    author = "Y. Kao and O.S. Luddington and S.R. Culleton and Roslyn Francis and J.A. Boucek",
    year = "2014",
    doi = "10.2967/jnmt.114.145292",
    language = "English",
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    pages = "265--268",
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    }

    A Gelatin liver phantom of suspended 90Y resin microspheres to simulate the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver. / Kao, Y.; Luddington, O.S.; Culleton, S.R.; Francis, Roslyn; Boucek, J.A.

    In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine Technology, Vol. 42, No. 4, 2014, p. 265-268.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A Gelatin liver phantom of suspended 90Y resin microspheres to simulate the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver

    AU - Kao, Y.

    AU - Luddington, O.S.

    AU - Culleton, S.R.

    AU - Francis, Roslyn

    AU - Boucek, J.A.

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc. For phantom studies involving 90Y PET/CT, homogeneous solutions of 90Y, for example, 90Y citrate, are commonly used. However, the microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is never homogeneous; therefore, such phantoms are physiologically unrealistic for simulating clinical scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop a safe and practical phantom capable of simulating the heterogeneous microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver. Methods: Gelatin (5%) was used to suspend 90Y resin microspheres, poured into plastic containers to simulate a liver with 2 tumors. Microspheres were added while the gelatin was maintained in a liquid state on a hot plate and continuously stirred with magnetic stir bars. The liquid microsphere mixture was then rapidly cooled in an ice bath while being stirred, resulting in a heterogeneous suspension of microspheres. The completed phantom was serially scanned by 90Y PET/CT over 2 wk. Results: All scans demonstrated a heterogeneous microsphere distribution throughout the liver and tumor inserts. Serendipitously, magnetic stir bars left inside the phantom produced CT artifacts similar to those caused by embolization coils, whereas pockets of air trapped within the gelatin during its preparation mimicked gas within hollow viscus. The microspheres and tumor inserts remained fixed and suspended within the gelatin, with no evidence of breakdown or leakage. Conclusion: A gelatin phantom realistically simulating the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is feasible to construct in a radiopharmacy.

    AB - © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc. For phantom studies involving 90Y PET/CT, homogeneous solutions of 90Y, for example, 90Y citrate, are commonly used. However, the microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is never homogeneous; therefore, such phantoms are physiologically unrealistic for simulating clinical scenarios. The aim of this work was to develop a safe and practical phantom capable of simulating the heterogeneous microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver. Methods: Gelatin (5%) was used to suspend 90Y resin microspheres, poured into plastic containers to simulate a liver with 2 tumors. Microspheres were added while the gelatin was maintained in a liquid state on a hot plate and continuously stirred with magnetic stir bars. The liquid microsphere mixture was then rapidly cooled in an ice bath while being stirred, resulting in a heterogeneous suspension of microspheres. The completed phantom was serially scanned by 90Y PET/CT over 2 wk. Results: All scans demonstrated a heterogeneous microsphere distribution throughout the liver and tumor inserts. Serendipitously, magnetic stir bars left inside the phantom produced CT artifacts similar to those caused by embolization coils, whereas pockets of air trapped within the gelatin during its preparation mimicked gas within hollow viscus. The microspheres and tumor inserts remained fixed and suspended within the gelatin, with no evidence of breakdown or leakage. Conclusion: A gelatin phantom realistically simulating the physiologic microsphere biodistribution of a postradioembolization liver is feasible to construct in a radiopharmacy.

    U2 - 10.2967/jnmt.114.145292

    DO - 10.2967/jnmt.114.145292

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    SN - 0091-4916

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    ER -