A dynamic, self-regulatory model of affect and performance: Interactions between states, traits and task demands

Gillian Yeo, E.R. Frederiks, C. Kiewitz, A. Neal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

State-trait consistency and valence principles were integrated within a dynamic self-regulatory framework to predict interactive effects of state affect, trait affect and task demands on performance. State affect and performance were measured repeatedly as individuals completed a complex and dynamic decision-making task. Task demands were manipulated at the within-person level. The beneficial effect of state positive affect was strongest for individuals with high trait positive affect; however this effect was only evident under high task demands. The detrimental effect of state negative affect was weakest for individuals with high trait negative affect, with this effect being constant across task demand levels. This study demonstrated that state-trait inconsistency can be bad for individuals with high trait positive affect and consistency can be good for individuals with high trait negative affect. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)429-443
JournalMotivation and Emotion
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A dynamic, self-regulatory model of affect and performance: Interactions between states, traits and task demands'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this