A comparison of parent-reported and self-reported psychosocial function scores of the PedsQL for children with non-severe burn

Amira Allahham, Matthew N. Cooper, Enrique Mergelsberg, Mark Fear, Lisa Martin, Fiona Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Quality of life of paediatric patients after burn injury is often assessed through parents who may score differently to their child. Non-severe burns are the most common type of burn injury in Western Australia, however, despite low severity and high survival rates, they can cause long term physical and psychosocial problems which need to be detected early in order to provide patients with optimal holistic care. Methods: Demographic and clinical data were collected from paediatric patients (5–16-year-old) with non-severe burns (<20% total body surface area), and Paediatric quality of life (PedsQL) questionnaires were collected from both the patient and their parent. Two cohorts of patients were assessed: first, those at approximately six months after burn, and second, those more than one-year after burn. Differences between parent-scores and self-scores were analysed using multivariate linear regression to assess the relationship between risk factors and observed differences in PedsQL scores. Results: Parents reported poorer Psychosocial Function (PSF) for younger children (p = 0.01) and for patients from higher socioeconomic status areas (p = 0.05) compared to their children. In the ‘Early Recovery Cohort’, female patients had significantly different scores to their parents (p < 0.01). In the ‘Late Recovery Cohort’, parents rated older patients lower than they rated themselves (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Age at burn, socioeconomic status, and female gender may increase the discrepancy in quality-of-life assessments between parents and patients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1122-1133
Number of pages12
JournalBurns
Volume49
Issue number5
Early online date7 Sept 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2023

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