A Comparison Between Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography and Fluorescein Angiography for the Imaging of Type 1 Neovascularization

the COFT-1 Study Group, Maiko Inoue, Jesse J. Jung, Chandrakumar Balaratnasingam, Kunal K. Dansingani, Elona Dhrami-Gavazi, Mihoko Suzuki, Talisa E. De Carlo, Abtin Shahlaee, Michael A. Klufas, Adil El Maftouhi, Jay S. Duker, Allen C. Ho, Maddalena Quaranta-El Maftouhi, David Sarraf, K. Bailey Freund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine the sensitivity of the combination of optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and structural optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detecting type 1 neovascularization (NV) and to determine significant factors that preclude visualization of type 1 NV using OCTA.

METHODS: Multicenter, retrospective cohort study of 115 eyes from 100 patients with type 1 NV. A retrospective review of fluorescein (FA), OCT, and OCTA imaging was performed on a consecutive series of eyes with type 1 NV from five institutions. Unmasked graders utilized FA and structural OCT data to determine the diagnosis of type 1 NV. Masked graders evaluated FA data alone, en face OCTA data alone and combined en face OCTA and structural OCT data to determine the presence of type 1 NV. Sensitivity analyses were performed using combined FA and OCT data as the reference standard.

RESULTS: A total of 105 eyes were diagnosed with type 1 NV using the reference. Of these, 90 (85.7%) could be detected using en face OCTA and structural OCT. The sensitivities of FA data alone and en face OCTA data alone for visualizing type 1 NV were the same (66.7%). Significant factors that precluded visualization of NV using en face OCTA included the height of pigment epithelial detachment, low signal strength, and treatment-naïve disease (P < 0.05, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: En face OCTA and structural OCT showed better detection of type 1 NV than either FA alone or en face OCTA alone. Combining en face OCTA and structural OCT information may therefore be a useful way to noninvasively diagnose and monitor the treatment of type 1 NV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)OCT314-OCT323
JournalInvestigative ophthalmology & visual science
Volume57
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2016
Externally publishedYes

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