A collaborative analysis of individual participant data from 19 prospective studies assesses circulating Vitamin D and prostate cancer risk

Endogenous Hormones, Nutritional Biomarkers and Prostate Cancer Collaborative Group

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous prospective studies assessing the relationship between circulating concentrations of vitamin D and prostate cancer risk have shown inconclusive results, particularly for risk of aggressive disease. In this study, we examine the association between prediagnostic concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH) 2 D] and the risk of prostate cancer overall and by tumor characteristics. Principal investigators of 19 prospective studies provided individual participant data on circulating 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH) 2 D for up to 13,462 men with incident prostate cancer and 20,261 control participants. ORs for prostate cancer by study-specific fifths of season-standardized vitamin D concentration were estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. 25(OH)D concentration was positively associated with risk for total prostate cancer (mul-tivariable-adjusted OR comparing highest vs. lowest study-specific fifth was 1.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–1.31; P trend < 0.001). However, this association varied by disease aggressiveness (P heterogeneity ¼ 0.014); higher circulating 25(OH)D was associated with a higher risk of nonaggressive disease (OR per 80 percentile increase ¼ 1.24, 1.13–1.36) but not with aggressive disease (defined as stage 4, metastases, or prostate cancer death, 0.95, 0.78–1.15). 1,25(OH) 2 D concentration was not associated with risk for prostate cancer overall or by tumor characteristics. The absence of an association of vitamin D with aggressive disease does not support the hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency increases prostate cancer risk. Rather, the association of high circulating 25(OH)D concentration with a higher risk of nonaggressive prostate cancer may be influenced by detection bias. Significance: This international collaboration comprises the largest prospective study on blood vitamin D and prostate cancer risk and shows no association with aggressive disease but some evidence of a higher risk of nonaggressive disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-285
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Research
Volume79
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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