A case study of the neuropsychological outcomes following microsurgery, conventional radiotherapy and stereotactic radiotherapy for an adults recurrent craniopharyngioma

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Abstract

Objective: To examine the neuropsychological outcomes for an adult patient, 2 years after receiving microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy for a recurrent craniopharyngioma; and the impact of a further intervention, stereotactic radiotherapy, on this level of neuropsychological functioning.Participant: JD, a 30 year old male whose recurrent craniopharyngioma had 2 years earlier been treated with two operations and conventional radiotherapy.Design: JD was assessed (using standardized clinical tests) before and after a course of stereotactic radiotherapy.Results: Prior to stereotactic radiotherapy (and 2 years after microsurgery and conventional radiotherapy) JDs IQ was intact, but considerable impairments were present in executive functioning, memory, theory of mind and processing speed. Fifteen months after stereotactic radiotherapy, all neuropsychological domains remained largely static or improved, supporting the utility of this treatment option in the neuropsychological domain. However, deficits in executive functioning, memory and processing speed remained.Conclusion: These findings suggest that, even after multiple treatments, substantial cognitive impairments can be present in an adult patient with a recurrent craniopharyngioma. This profile of deficits underlines the inadequacy of relying purely on IQ as a marker for cognitive health in this population and emphasizes the need to include neuropsychological impairments as a focus of rehabilitation with these patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)104-111
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Injury
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes

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