Patient satisfaction and participation in the doctor-patient relationship, 1991

Dataset

Description

This study was designed to examine the ability of patients to estimate how long they need to spend with their doctor, and the effect of a patient making such an estimate on his/her satisfaction with the consultation and on participation in the doctor-patient relationship. It was hoped that the study would indicate whether time-estimation by patients would encourage patients to be actively involved in the consultation, and whether it would be a useful tool in general practice. The study involved the development of measurement tools for patient satisfaction and participation. Patients were assigned to three groups: (1) the patient was asked to estimate the time the doctor would need to spend with him/her, and the doctor was informed of the patient's estimate; (2) the patient was asked to estimate the time the doctor would need to spend with him/her, and the doctor was not informed of the patient's estimate; and (3) the patient was not asked for an estimate. The data file indicates to which group the patient was assigned, and gives the patient's responses to 22 questions concerning satisfaction with the consultation, and the doctor's responses to 7 questions about the consultation. The patient questionnaire covered topics such as whether the patient would recommend the doctor to friends, whether the consultation seemed rushed, whether the patient understood the doctor, and whether the patient always sees the same doctor. The doctor questionnaire asked for the doctor's perceptions about whether the doctor and patient had good rapport, and whether the patient seemed motivated about treatment and seemed to understand his/her condition. The patient's age is also recorded in the data file.
Date made available17 Dec 2018
PublisherDataverse (Australian Data Archive, ADA)
Temporal coverage12 Sep 1991 - 3 Dec 1991
Date of data production27 Aug 2004

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