Can therapists estimate current patient progress and predict final outcomes with the provision of feedback?

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  • THESIS - DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY - FLOOD Nicola Kim - 2018

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Abstract

This thesis examined whether feedback can improve therapists' Judgements of patient progress and outcomes, and whether an empirical method of prediction would be superior to therapists at predicting negative outcomes. It was found that feedback led to some improvements in therapists' ability to estimate patient progress and predict outcomes. However, therapists still struggled to identify which patients would have negative progress and outcomes. Therefore, the final study compared two empirical methods that predicted negative outcomes and found the simpler clinical significance method to be superior. The findings highlight the need for therapists to use feedback to inform their treatment decisions.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
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Thesis sponsors
  • Australian Government Research Training Program
Award date4 Apr 2018
DOIs
StateUnpublished - 2018


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