Researcher Profile

Professor Gary Kendrick

Gary Kendrick
Gary Kendrick

Phone: +61 8 6488 3998

Research Expertise:
  • Demography, recruitment ecology and spatial dynamics of seagrasses and seaweeds
  • Ecology of marine macroalgae
  • Habitat mapping
  • Marine diversity and conservation
  • Seagrass restoration
  • Spatially explicit population modelling

Teaching

Undergraduate Teaching experience

2012- present – Winthrop Professor – Continued teaching in Marine Science (Introduction in Marine Science), developing teaching in Ecology (Ecological Processes). Research Leader (Marine Ecology) in the Ocean Institute.

2009- 2012 – Professor – Continued teaching in Marine Science. Became Acting Director of the newly formed UWA Oceans Institute 2009. On executive committee from the Australian National Network in Marine Science – a consortium between University of Western Australia, University of Tasmania and James Cook University to allow for shared undergraduate and graduate teaching across campuses.

2006-2009 – Associate Professor – Continued teaching in Marine Science. Became Deputy Head of School, School of Plant Biology 2006.

2000- 2006 – Senior Lecturer – Continued development in curricula in Marine Science. Restructured Marine Science degree in 2004-2006. Representative for Marine Science on Faculty Education and Learning Committee – 2004. Marine Science Honours Coordinator (2001-2004)

1998-2000 – Lecturer - Curriculum development in marine science. Developed and taught in 2nd and 3rd Year subjects in Marine Science (2nd Year: Introduction to Marine Science, Aquatic Botany, 3rd Year: Biological Oceanography; Field Techniques in Marine Science). Marine Science Honours Co-ordinator (1999-2000).

Formal Graduate Student Supervision
I have successfully supervised 19 PhD, 1 MSc and 22 Honours students to completion, and am presently supervising 8 PhD students and 2 Honours Students. Two of my PhD students received UWA distinctions for their thesis. I find the role of supervisor very rewarding, and my continued collaboration with my graduated PhD students a major stimulus for my own research.

Completed Ph.D. and M.Sc. Students

1999 Cameron Sim, Ph.D. The University of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. topic: The ecology of coralline algae on temperate limestone reefs in Western Australia
co-supervisor: Professor D.I. Walker

2001 Meredith Campey, Ph.D. The University of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A.
topic: Ecological Significance of the seagrasses Posidonia coriacea and Heterozostera tasmanica.
co-supervisor: Professor D.I. Walker

2002 Mathew Vanderklift, Univ. of Western Australia. Crawley, W.A. Topic: The importance of grazer diversity in structuring macroalgal assemblages.

2003 Thomas Wernberg-Moller, PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. (Distinction)Topic: Processes regulating heterogeneity in seaweed landscapes in Western Australia

2005 Nisse Goldberg, PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A (Distinction).Topic: Macroalgal ecology in the Recherche Archipelago, Western Australia
co-supervisor: Professor D.I. Walker

2006 Hugh Forehead, PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A Topic: The ecology and biogeochemistry of sandy sediments in the warm temperate coastal waters of Western Australia
co-supervisor: Dr Anya Waite, Dr Peter Thompson

2006 Ben Toohey, PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A Topic: Recovery of algal assemblages from canopy disturbance: patterns and processes over a range of reef structures

2006 Dianne Watson, PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A Topic: Use of underwater stereo-video to measure fish assemblage structure, spatial distribution of fishes and change in assemblages with protection from fishing
co-supervisor: Dr Euan Harvey

2007 David Abdo: PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A Topic: Maintenance and structuring of two temperate Haliclonid sponge populations
Co-supervisors: Dr Euan Harvey,Dr Justin McDonald, Dr Jane Fromont

2007 Katrina Baxter PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: Linking seafloor mapping and ecological models to improved classification of marine habitats: opportunities and lessons learnt
Co-supervisor: Dr Kimberly Van Niel

2008 Kylie Ryan PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: Small no-take marine protected areas and wave exposure affect temperatesubtidal reef communities at Marmion Marine Park, Western Australia
Co-supervisors: Dr Euan Harvey, Dr Jessica Meeuwig, Prof Diana Walker

2008 Brenton Chatfield PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: How to find the one that got away: Predicting the distribution of temperate demersal fish from environmental variables
Co-supervisor: Dr Kimberly Van Niel

2008 Raquel de Azeredo Muniz PhD, Escola Nacional de Botanica Tropical, Institute de Pesquisas Jardim Botanico do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Topic: Efeitos do dossel de Sargassum vulgare (Ochrophyta – Fucales) em duas communidades na Baía da Ilha Grande, R.J.
Co-supervisor: Dra. Márcia A. de O. Figueiredo.

2009 Renae Hovey PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: Responses of Posidonia australis Hook.f. and Posidonia sinuosa Cambridge et Kuo
transplants to nitrogen, phosphorus and iron additions in Oyster Harbour, Western Australia, with focus on root development.
Co-supervisors: Dr Marion Cambridge

2011 Ben Saunders PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: The ecology of territorial herbivorous damselfish (Genus Parma) on temperate Western Australian rocky reefs.
Co-supervisors: Dr Euan Harvey

2011 John Statton PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: Restoration potential of Posidonia australis seedlings is enhanced through aquaculture.
Co-supervisors: Prof. Kingsley Dixon, Dr Marion Cambridge

2011 Kirrily White MSc, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: Patterns in Fish Assemblages and Seagrass Herbivory in a Temperate Australian Seagrass Meadow.
Co-supervisor: Dr Mark Westera

2012 Jillian Ooi PhD, Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: The role of sedimentary environments on seagrass distribution and abundance at Pulau Tinggi, Malaysia
Co-supervisor: Associate Prof. Kimberly Van Niel

2012 David Rivers PhD., Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: Seagrass colonization into gaps in meadows – the role of seedling recruitment
Co-supervisor Prof Walker

2012 Margaret Mohring PhD (under examination), Univ. of Western Australia, Crawley, W.A. Topic: Threat of climate change on reproductive phenology and gametogenesis in the kelp Ecklonia radiate. Co-supervisor: Dr Thomas Wernberg,

Industrial Relevance

Professor Kendrick has worked closely with industry since his initial position as Lecturer in 1998 that was fnded through a collaboration between UWA and Cockburn Cement Ltd.
His expertise is in design of impact assessment and ERMPs, resouce mapping, assessing impacts to seagrass and macroalgae and as an industry expert assessor for marine impact asssessment. Gary also has been very involved in seagrass revegetation programs and has studied optimizing successful planting units and transplantation of temperate seagrass species.

Previous Positions

September 2009 – June 2011 Acting Director, The UWA Oceans Institute and Professor, School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, W.A. Australia

February 2006 – August 2009: Associate Professor and Deputy Head of School of Plant
Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, W.A. Australia

July 2001 – February 2006: Senior Lecturer (Biological Oceanography), School of Plant
Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, W.A. Australia

January 1998-July 2001: Lecturer (Biological Oceanography), Botany Department, University
of Western Australia, Crawley, 6009, W.A. Australia

February 1996-December 1997: Research Fellow, Botany Department, University of
Western Australia. Seagrass dynamics on Success Bank, Western Australia

October 1992-February 1996: Marine Plant Ecologist, CSIRO Division of Fisheries
Developed techniques to assess coastal impacts to marine plant communities in
the field and in mesocosms.

Funding Received

Research Income: Between 2001 and 2011 (10 Years) I have generated with my colleagues $10,317,312 of research income for marine benthic ecological studies around Australia. Since 2006 I have successfully obtained with my colleagues $7,257,975 of research income.

Future Research

His long-term research goal is to move from marine ecological studies that describe the distribution of marine organisms to a predictive framework for understanding the spatial linkages between marine species distributions, their biology and the physical environment.
Future research programs include:
1. Ecology and environmental drivers of seagrass and macroalgal assemblages in a macrotidal tropical environment in the Kimberley WA
2. Effect of turbity from dredging on seagrass growth survival and reproduction
3. Effect of desalination outfall waters on growth and survival of seagrasses
4. Resilience in tropical coral macroalgae and seagrasses.
5. Carbon stores and sequestration in seagrass meadows
6. Seed based restoration of seagrasses

Roles, responsibilities and expertise

Kendrick is divided among teaching, research and administration (33%:33%:33%) and the balance between these areas has varied with administrative responsibilities. He was the Deputy Head of School for the School of Plant Biology 2006-2009, and he was the inaugural Director of the Centre for Marine Futures in 2008. He was acting in the role of Director for the UWA Oceans Institute 2009-2011.

He presently holds the following responsibilities:
Discipline Leader: Marine Systems (School of Plant Biology.
Research Leader: Marine Ecology (The Oceans Institute)
Oceans Institute Leadership Team: in support of the Director,

Biography

Gary Kendrick is a research and teaching Professor at The Oceans Institute and the School of Plant Biology, the University of Western Australia. Gary Kendrick’s long-term research goal is to develop a predictive framework for understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics between marine species distributions, their biology and the physical environment. His work on marine landscape ecology and spatial ecology of seagrasses has identified appropriate descriptors of landscape/spatial structure, modelled species distributions, quantified extensive historical losses of seagrass habitat due to human impacts and modelled emergent landscape-scale phenomena related to the clonal growth of seagrasses at the shoot scale and the evolution of seagrass landscapes. This line of research has led him to question our understanding of sexual recruitment in seagrasses and has led to recent work on dispersal, recruitment and genetics of seagrasses

ID: 17621

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